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Frequently Asked Questions
1. What grains are safe for Celiacs to eat?
2. What is Gluten?
3. What is Celiac Disease?
4. How is Celiac Disease triggered?
5. How many people in America have Celiac Disease?
6. How many people are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed with Celiac Disease?
7. Is Celiac Disease a genetic condition?
8. Are there any cures for Celiac Disease?
9. Can Celiac Disease lead to other disorders?
10. Which grains are Gluten-Free and safe for Celiacs?
11. What grains are not allowed in any form for a gluten free diet?
12. Which Restaurant Chains have Gluten-Free options on their menus?
13. What is the range of symptoms for Celiac Disease?
14. What foods are naturally Gluten-Free?
15. How to prepare Gluten-Free foods at home?
16. What common foods contain Gluten?
17. How do most Gluten Free Baked goods taste?
18. Which foods contain Casein?
19. What are Casein-free alternatives?
20. What is Kosher Pareve?
21. What foods may contain casein?
22. Which foods may contain gluten?
1. What grains are safe for Celiacs to eat?
The following grains and flours are safe for celiacs: rice flour, corn flour, millet flour, sorghum flour, buckwheat flour, amaranth flour, rape flour, quinoa flour, teff flour, ragi flour, soy flour, potato flour, tapioca flour, bean flours, garfava flour, arrowroot flour, montina flour and Jobs's Tears flour. Please check with your doctor before consuming any of these flours.
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2. What is Gluten?
Gluten (from Latin gluten "glue") is the composite of two proteins called gliadin and glutenin. These exist, conjoined with starch, in the endosperm of some grass-related grains, notably wheat, rye, and barley. Gliadin and glutenin comprise about 80% of the protein contained in wheat seed. Being insoluble in water, they can be purified by washing away the associated starch. Worldwide, gluten can be a source of protein, both in foods prepared directly from sources containing it, and as an additive to foods otherwise low in protein.
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3. What is Celiac Disease?
Celiac disease is an autoimmune digestive disease that damages the villi of the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. What does this mean? Essentially the body is attacking itself every time a person with celiac consumes gluten.
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4. How is Celiac Disease triggered?
Celiac disease is triggered by consumption of the protein called gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye. When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the finger-like villi of the small intestine. When the villi become damaged, the body is unable to absorb nutrients into the bloodstream, which can lead to malnourishment.
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5. How many people in America have Celiac Disease?
One in 133 Americans have celiac disease. Three million Americans across all races, ages and genders suffer from celiac.
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6. How many people are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed with Celiac Disease?
95% of celiacs are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed with other conditions.
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7. Is Celiac Disease a genetic condition?
17% of celiac patients have an immediate family member who also has celiac.
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8. Are there any cures for Celiac Disease?
There are NO pharmaceutical cures for celiac disease. A 100% gluten-free diet is the only existing treatment for celiac today.
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9. Can Celiac Disease lead to other disorders?
Celiac Disease can lead to a number of other disorders including infertility, reduced bone density, neurological disorders, some cancers, and other autoimmune diseases.
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10. Which grains are Gluten-Free and safe for Celiacs?
Almond Meal Flour, Amaranth, Arrowroot, Bean Flours, Brown Rice Flour, Buckwheat, Coconut Flour, Cornstarch, Garbanzo Bean Flour, Guar Gum,Millet, Nut Flours, Potato Flour, Quinoa, Roasted Kasha, Sorghum Flour, Soy, Sweet Rice Flour, Tapioca Flour, Teff, White Rice Flour, Xantham Gum
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11. What grains are not allowed in any form for a gluten free diet?
Barley, Bran, Bulgur, Cereals, Couscous, Farina, Graham, Kamut, Malt, Malt Syrup, Malt Vinegar, Matzo Meal, Oats (some GF options available), Rye, Spelt, Triticale, Udon, wheat, wheat germ , wheat starch, wheat protein, Einkorn wheat, Durum wheat, Faro wheat, Semolina wheat
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12. Which Restaurant Chains have Gluten-Free options on their menus?
P.F. Changs, Pizza Fusion,
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13. What is the range of symptoms for Celiac Disease?
Abdominal Pain, Behavioral Disorders, Bloating, Constipation, Anemia, Skin Rash, Delayed Growth, Diabetes, Chronic Diarrhea, Weight Loss, Weight Gain, Chronic Fatigue, Dental Enamel Defects and Discolored Teeth, Headaches, Gas, Joint Pain, Neurological Conditions, Vitamin deficiencies, Reproductive Issues, Insomnia, Migraine, Autoimmune Disease, Chronic Constipation, Heart Disease, Irritability, Osteoporosis, Anxiety, Depression, Arthritis, Acid Reflux
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14. What foods are naturally Gluten-Free?
Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, legumes, vegetables, fruit, most dairy products, are all naturally Gluten-Free
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15. How to prepare Gluten-Free foods at home?
In order to offer a Gluten-Free dish at home, you must clean work surfaces and utensils thoroughly in order to avoid any contamination with gluten.
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16. What common foods contain Gluten?
breads, pizza, pretzels, pasta, bagels, sauces, doughnuts, cakes, pies, cookies, cereals, made with- wheat, oats, rye, barley
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17. How do most Gluten Free Baked goods taste?
Producing baked goods without gluten presents significant challenges, and can result in dry, crumbly, or gummy products. The good news is Shabtai Gourmet Gluten Free Baked goods taste like the real deal!
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18. Which foods contain Casein?
Milk, Whey, Cream, Custard, Yogurt, Puddings, Sour Cream, Soup Bases, Cheese, Creamed Soups and Vegetable, Butter, Ice Milk, Sherbet, Ice Cream, White of Milk Chocolate
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19. What are Casein-free alternatives?
Coconut Milk, Rice Milk, Potato Milk, Hemp Milk, Coconut Milk, Coconut Butter, Pareve Creams and Creamers, Italian Ices, Sorbet
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20. What is Kosher Pareve?
Foods that are neither meat nor dairy are called pareve. This means that they contain no meat or dairy derivatives, and have not been cooked or mixed with any meat or dairy foods. Eggs, fish, fruit, vegetables, grains, and juices in their natural, unprocessed state are common pareve foods. Other pareve foods include pasta, soft drinks, coffee and tea, and many types of candy and snacks. Products that have been processed in any way should be bought only if they bear reliable kosher certification. Although pareve foods present fewer kashrut complexities than either meat or dairy foods, certain points must be kept in mind: Pareve foods may lose their pareve status if processed on dairy equipment or when additives are used. The label may give no indication of this processing. Chocolate, cookies and other snacks should not be used with meat or meaty foods unless they are certified pareve. Certain fruits, vegetables and grains must be checked for the presence of small insects and larvae (See Vegetables and Kashrut ) Eggs must be checked for the presence of blood spots (See Eggs)
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21. What foods may contain casein?
Ghee, Margarine, Sausage, Tuna Fish, Lunch Meats, Dairy-Free Cheese (many brands), Hot Dogs, Cosmetics, Medicines, Semi-Sweet Chocolate, Lactic Acid, Artificial Flavorings
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22. Which foods may contain gluten?
Beers, Ales, Lager, Breading Mixes, Coating Mixes, Brown Rice Syrup, Communion Wafers, Croutons, Dressings, Drugs and over the counter medications, Energy Bars, Flour and Cereal products, Herbal supplements, Imitation Bacon, Imitation Seafood, Marinades, Nutritional Supplements, Pastas, Processed Luncheon Meats, Sauces, Gravies, Self Basting Poultry, Soy Sauce, Soy Sauce Solids, Soup Bases, Stuffings, Thickeners, Vitamins and Mineral Supplements
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